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Fall 2016 Semester
Jul 05, 2020
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Information Use this page to maintain syllabus information, learning objectives, required materials, and technical requirements for the course.

Syllabus Information
CRIM 4800 - Crime Mapping
Associated Term: Fall 2016 Semester
Learning Objectives: Describe how data may be acquired, stored, transmitted, and processed.Throughout the course students learn to identify different forms of spatial data. This is a lab-based course where students identify and upload data into Georgraphic Information System (GIS) anlaysis programs, manipulate spatial data and link spatial data to other existing data sources to examine the patterns of crime across placeAnalyze at least one important type of data and summarize the results of an analysis in ways that provide insight.Through class lectures and labs students learn basic principles of multiple forms of spatial data. These data include counts of crime incidents from police records, neighborhood characteristics (provided by the census), and information about the contextual characteristics of communities (locations of bars, schools, liquor stores). Students learn techniques to compare the spatial distributions of crime and how they change over time. Interpretations of such patterns are rooted in discussions of place and its influence on crime.Use mathematical methods and/or computational tools to perform analysis.Students complete exercises demonstrating their knowledge of both descriptive and inferential spatial analytical methodologies. In terms of the latter, the course a series of techniques are taught which focus on spatial dependency, specifically which allow students to identify the presence and location of the clustering of violence.Evaluate and critique choices made in selection, analysis, and presentation of data.Through major course assignments student practice using tools that provide a more complete understanding of crime locations, and how criminological theory and geographic information together can be used to help develop crime prevention/reduction strategies. Course readings present strengths and limitations of various criminological perspectives, how they may be used to inform enforcement decisions. Combined with class exercises, students learn how to use GIS applications to create maps that convey a clear message regarding the spatial distribution of a given criminal behavior and identify the limitations of spatial analysis for solving crime problems.Formulate a question that can be answered through investigation or a challenge that can be addressed through research or design.Throughout the course, students are asked to apply their learning of theory and quantitative literature to develop research questions that can be tested using Geographic Information System (mapping) software. This includes the use of data collected for crime incidents, neighborhood characteristics (provided by the census), and information about the contextual characteristics of communities (locations of bars, schools, liquor stores). The use of a variety of data sources allows students to understand better the connection between structural conditions (the built environment) and criminal deviance.This is a lab-based course where students identify and upload data into Georgraphic Information System (GIS) anlaysis programs, manipulate spatial data and link spatial data to other existing data sources to examine the patterns of crime across place through lab assignments.Develop and use models based on evidence to predict and show relationships among variables between systems or components of systems in the natural and/or designed world.In this course students learn both descriptive and inferential spatial analytical methodologies. In terms of the latter, a series of techniques are taught which focus on spatial dependency, specifically which allow students to identify the presence and location of the clustering of violence. In addition, these techniques allow for comparisons of the spatial distributions of crime and how they change over time. Through written work students must demonstrate interpretations of such patterns and identify the role of place and its influence on crime.Use and question scientific principles and practices to evaluate issues raised by the interplay of science, technology, and society.Enhancing critical thinking skills is a primary objective for this course. The importance of rigorous scientific investigation using GIS is emphasized. Over the course, students learn the strengths of various geographically-based analytical techniques, their proper application, as well as their limitations. Students are encouraged to use this knowledge to evaluate the results from scientific studies from a critical, but quantitatively informed, perspective.
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